Wednesday, July 05, 2017

"You had to be there."



I said a few weeks ago that I was planning on weeding out about 1/10th of my 640-or-so books (i.e., about 64). So far, I've sold exactly ONE on eBay (Roger Stone on Trump election --- though I ultimately want a collection covering the historic occasion, this one was very poorly written). And I've acquired about a dozen more.

Here's how this happens: The Warhol book at the upper left of the picture was left out by the trash at my apartment complex, so I had to rescue it. I hadn't thought about Warhol in years, but this book made me think about Warhol again. Was he a visionary? An opportunistic exploiter of weaknesses of others? (I guess the safe answer would be "Oh, a combination of both." But actually, not the latter at all, I think. I think he was a dispassionate sociologist, curious about people's innate behavior.) So I just HAD TO order a whole bunch of Warhol books (plus Basquiat for the era and racial interpretations of the era plus voyeuristic early-death tale of someone I didn't care about, kind of like with the Edie Sedgwick book that I've had for 20 years) to try to get/re-get a grasp of what he was all about. I ordered "Diaries" first (am now on my 2nd read), but am currently most enamored of the slyly earnest voice of "Popism" and "Philosophy." From the latter's "Love (Senility)" section:
It's the long life spans that are throwing all the old values and their applications out of whack. When people used to learn about sex at 15 and die at 35, they obviously were going to have fewer problems than people today who learn about sex at 8 or so, I guess, and live to be 80. That's a long time to play around with the same concept. ...

I love every "lib" movement there is, because after the "lib" the things that were always a mystique become understandable and boring, and then nobody has to feel left out if they're not part of what is happening [I think this might be the key to Warhol]...

Being married [according to movie images] looked so wonderful that life didn't seem livable if you weren't lucky enough to have a husband or wife. To the singles, marriage seemed beautiful, the trappings seemed wonderful, and the sex was always implied to be automatically great---no one could ever seem to find words to describe it because "you had to be there" to know how good it was. It was almost like a conspiracy on the part of the married people not to let it out how it wasn't necessarily completely wonderful to be married and having sex; they could have taken a load off the single people's minds if they'd just been candid. But it was always a fairly well-kept secret that if you were married to somebody you didn't have enough room in bed and might have to face bad breath in the morning....

There are so many songs about love. But I was thrilled the other day when somebody mailed me the lyrics to a song that was about how he didn't care about anything, and how he didn't care about me. It was very good. He managed to really convey the idea that he really didn't care....

I wonder if it's possible to have a love affair that lasts forever. If you're married for 30 years and you're "cooking breakfast for the one you love" and he walks in, does his heart really skip a beat? I mean if it's just a regular morning. I guess it skips a beat over that breakfast and that's nice, too. It's nice to have a little breakfast made for you....

My ideal wife would have a lot of bacon, bring it all home, and have a TV station besides....

No comments: